Psychiatric and Behavior

The behavior of a child with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) can often be the most difficult and trying problem for parents and family. Aggression, sudden rage, hyperactivity, attention deficit, acting out, obsessive-compulsive behavior, repetitive behaviors, staying in their “own world,” being nonverbal even at an age when most children are speaking, and other autistic behaviors have all occurred in children with TSC. Such behavior does not mean you are a bad parent; it is due to TSC.

Some children with TSC, usually those who have a mental disability, are also diagnosed with autism. There appears to be a connection between TSC and autism that is not understood, and active research is exploring this link. It is important for you to keep notes on your child’s behavior and on whether or not he or she reaches the developmental milestones, and bring them to the attention of your child’s physicians. The earlier these behaviors are identified and special programs outlined for your child, the better.

Occasionally, individuals with TSC are also diagnosed with schizophrenia, bipolar disease (manic depression), depression, or other psychiatric disorders. Again, bring any unusual, disruptive behaviors to the attention of your child’s physicians and be your child’s advocate so that he or she can obtain optimal medical and psychiatric treatment.

 

ADHD and TSC [PDF]

TSC and ASD [PDF]

CONSENSUS CLINICAL GUIDELINES FOR ASSESSMENT OF TAND [PDF]

TAND_checklist 2014

This information © of the Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance and used with permission 2014. All rights reserved.